Tuesday, 21 June 2016

Haylock and Cockburn

My apologies to any readers of this blog for a long period of silence. Anne Cockburn and I have been busy working on a fifth edition of our Book, Understanding Mathematics for Young Children. We finished this last week and have sent off the 'manuscript' to the Sage Publications.

The word 'Manuscript', which is still used in publishing circles, means, of course, 'written by hand', which is strangely archaic, given that no pens and no paper were involved in either the writing process or the submission of the new edition to the publisher.

We hope to see the new edition on the shelves (another anachronism, since most of the sales will be online!) in the first half of next year.

We have had to rework the book to ensure that it is consistent with the language and content of the new primary mathematics curriculum in England. This has introduced some new material for Year 2 children, such as fractions. The new curriculum has meant a general shift of content down from Year 3 to Year 2 (and likewise from Year 4 to Year 3). So, to avoid our book getting even longer, we have had to make a decision to reduce the age range covered. So, it is now described as 'a guide for teachers of children aged 3–7 years' (rather than 3–8). This is a better fit for teacher training courses anyway, since it is now clearly aimed at Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1.

So, with that done, I hope to get back to writing the occasional blog again! Watch this space.

3 comments:

  1. Hi Derek, I've bought a couple of your books and they are excellent: very clear explanations and guidance.
    You may wish to rethink one of your examples however, as the darts 401-180 scenario on pg98 of Mathematics Explained... (5th ed.) is odd. In most games of darts, you aim to reach zero, not 401. (Granted, there's nothing to stop you playing a game of "first to 401" with a mate, but this isn't the usual darts game that most people play!).

    Overall, really great books. Cheers.

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    Replies
    1. Good point. I'll note this for the sixth edition!

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